Ghana Accra

Generating green jobs through community-based waste management solutions

Accra_ © Eunika Sopotnicka _ Getty Images

Accra

Hon. Elizabeth Naa Kwatsoe Tawiah Sackey Mayor of Accra, Chief Executive of the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (AMA)

The Accra Metropolitan Assembly, working in partnership with the C40 Cities Finance Facility, will help transform Accra’s waste sector. This project aims to increase recycling and composting, reducing waste dumping and decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from landfills and open burning.

The Accra Metropolitan Assembly, working in partnership with the C40 Cities Finance Facility, will help transform Accra’s waste sector. This project aims to increase recycling and composting, reducing waste dumping and decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from landfills and open burning.

  • Location Accra - Ghana
  • 192 297 tons / year Organic Waste Diverted from Landfill
  • Population 5 455 692 (2021)

Currently, waste in Accra is collected by private and informal services, with the vast majority of waste being sent to landfills without being sorted. As the organic waste in these landfills degrades, it releases methane, a potent greenhouse gas. This contributes to 44% of Accra’s emissions coming from its waste sector.

This project will create a new system - with separation of waste at source and community composting. This will create green, secure, and safe jobs, with over 200 local informal waste workers benefiting from formal labour conditions.

Households Impacted

140,000
0

Reduced Co2e per year in tons

168,079
0
UK_ © Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd _ Getty Images
UK_ © Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd _ Getty Images

Open burning is the leading cause of small particulate matter in the air in Accra, which can cause serious health issues such as asthma, cancer, lung and heart conditions, and strokes. If Accra's air pollution levels remain at 2015 levels, it is estimated that 70,000 years of life will be lost in the adult population due to air pollution. This project aims to improve air quality in Accra by reducing open burning of waste, and improve hygiene conditions in low-income neighbourhoods by properly disposing of waste.

Additionally, better waste management will help to reduce the impact of flooding, which Accra frequently experiences. These floods can be exacerbated by indiscriminately dumped waste clogging drains and bodies of water like the Korle Lagoon. When floods leave stagnant, contaminated water, it can lead to the spread of diseases such as cholera, malaria, and dengue.

The project will start with a pilot in three low-income communities and eventually expand to cover the entire city, with a treatment facility being built once 140,000 households have been included. After that, the project may be expanded to other cities in Ghana, such as Kumasi and Tema. With this project, Accra has the potential to become a leader in waste management in West Africa.